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Hire Me! Hire me for your writing assignment or event. I'm reasonable and reliable. Also looking for additional writing gigs. Email me at rclimpert003@yahoo.com

Based in Atlanta, GA - Rick Limpert is an award-winning writer, a best-selling author, and a featured sports travel writer.

Named the No. 1 Sports Technology writer in the U.S. on Oct 1, 2014.

Entries in NASA (23)

Sunday
Jun022019

Kindle Free Pick of the Week: Buzz Aldrin: The Life and Legacy of the Second Astronaut to Walk on the Moon

A book on American hero, Buzz Aldrin.

At 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969, time stood still throughout the world, as thousands converged on the Kennedy Space Center and millions tuned in on live television. At that instant, the first rumbles began to shake the ground, as a small spacecraft attached to the giant Saturn V rocket several hundred feet tall started lifting off. Quickly being propelled several thousand miles per hour, it takes just a few minutes to reach a speed of 15,000 miles per hour, and just a few more minutes to enter orbit at 18,000 miles per hour. Apollo 11 was on its way to a historic first landing on the Moon.

Apollo 11’s trip to the Moon may have started on that day in 1969, but the journey had begun over a decade earlier as part of the Space Race between the United States and the Soviet Union. While landing on the Moon was a noble goal proposed as early as 1961 by President Kennedy, NASA and the nation as a whole moved with urgency simply to best the Soviet Union, which had spent the 1950s beating America to important space-related firsts, including launching the first satellite and cosmonaut in orbit. In fact, President Eisenhower’s administration began the design for the Apollo program in 1960 in hopes of getting a head start to the Moon, despite the fact the plans originated a year before the first Russian cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, orbited the Earth and two years before John Glenn did.

Wednesday
May302018

Camera Melts Filming Rocket Launch

Strange but true.

Link: https://www.techly.com.au/2018/05/29/rocket-launch-nasa-camera-melted/

From the NASA Blog:

NASA photographer Bill Ingalls has been shooting for the agency for 30 years. His creativity and efforts to get unique images are well known within the agency and to those who follow it. He knows where to set up his cameras, so what explains the view from the camera, as seen in the GIF above?

"I had six remotes, two outside the launch pad safety perimeter and four inside," said Ingalls. "Unfortunately, the launch started a grass fire that toasted one of the cameras outside the perimeter."

Monday
Jul172017

NASA Moon Dust Bag For Sale

A long-lost bag used by Neil Armstrong to bring back moon samples during the Apollo 11 mission is for sale.

http://www.news4jax.com/news/weird-news/for-sale-the-bag-used-by-neil-armstrong-to-collect-moon-dust

Tuesday
May172016

UFOs Seen During Shuttle Missions

This article says so...

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/unseen-nasa-videos-show-ufos-7986336

It is the Mirror after all...

Thursday
Jul162015

Close Up Images of Pluto

More Pluto news for the week.